THE RESISTANCE is the much anticipated sequel to THE DECLARATION.  It picks up where THE DECLARATION leaves off and is told through Peter’s eyes.  He and Anna live together with Ben, Anna’s brother, in a run down house trying to keep out of the way.  Peter and Anna aren’t comfortable being Legal yet and find the stares and nasty comments coming from the other citizens unsettling. 

Peter and Anna work for the Underground whenever they can.  They both want to see the Declaration a thing of the past.  Peter gets his chance when his grandfather and head of Pincent Pharma offers him a position at the company.  Pincent Pharma is responsible for Longevity, the drug that makes an extended life possible.  Peter uses this opportunity to get information for the Underground.  What he finds causes him to question his beliefs about the Declaration, the Underground, and his relationship with Anna.  It takes uncovering a horrible secret to put him back on track.

THE RESISTANCE was just as good as THE DECLARATION.  The suspense keeps you turning page after page.  Peter’s character is so likeable and his devotion to Anna is heartwarming.  Gemma Malley leaves it open for another story and I for one can’t wait to see what happens next.

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THE RESISTANCE is the much anticipated sequel to THE DECLARATION.  It picks up where THE DECLARATION leaves off and is told through Peter’s eyes.  He and Anna live together with Ben, Anna’s brother, in a run down house trying to keep out of the way.  Peter and Anna aren’t comfortable being Legal yet and find the stares and nasty comments coming from the other citizens unsettling. 

Peter and Anna work for the Underground whenever they can.  They both want to see the Declaration a thing of the past.  Peter gets his chance when his grandfather and head of Pincent Pharma offers him a position at the company.  Pincent Pharma is responsible for Longevity, the drug that makes an extended life possible.  Peter uses this opportunity to get information for the Underground.  What he finds causes him to question his beliefs about the Declaration, the Underground, and his relationship with Anna.  It takes uncovering a horrible secret to put him back on track.

THE RESISTANCE was just as good as THE DECLARATION.  The suspense keeps you turning page after page.  Peter’s character is so likeable and his devotion to Anna is heartwarming.  Gemma Malley leaves it open for another story and I for one can’t wait to see what happens next.

In a not specified future, the battle between Pro-Life and Pro-Choice reached the boiling point and culminated with the “Second Civil War” also known as the “Heartland War”.  After many deaths on both sides, an agreement was reached – a compromise.  The Bill of Life was added to the Constitution. 

The Bill of Life states that life starts at conception and is protected until the age of thirteen.  Once a child reaches the age of thirteen, the parent has the right to Unwind them.  Unwinding is a possibility until the child reaches eighteen and once the child is eighteen, they are safe.  Unwinding is a process where the child officially remains alive – but in a “divided state.”  Every part of the body is harvested at a Harvest Camp and preserved and later used for people that need replacement parts.  For instance, if someone is suffering from heart failure – instead of have bypass surgery you just get a new heart that once belonged to a child that was Unwound.

The story follows three kids – Connor, Lev, and Risa – strangers until fate brought them together on their separate ways to be Unwound. 

Connor is a hot-head and has caused his parents just a little too much trouble.  He accidentally comes across the papers his parents signed to agree to the Unwinding and decides to escape instead of allowing the government come and take him away. 

Risa is a ward of the state living in an orphange.  She is a gifted pianist, but not quite gifted enough to prevent her from being Unwound. 

Lev is a tithe.  His parents are so dedicated to their religion that they tithe 10% of everything they have.  Lev is the 10th child in the family and knew he was going to be a tithe from the moment he could understand.  He looked forward to the Unwinding and felt he was fulfilling a special purpose with his life.

UNWIND by Neal Shusterman is a frightening look at what a technologically advanced society could turn out to be when the government has the ability to control life to the extent that every part of the human body is available for a problem-free transplant.  Yes, it would be nice to replace the part of your brain that was causing epilepsy, but would you want to know that some child between the age of thirteen and eighteen “died” for you to get it?  Shusterman gives us a brief look at the possible ramifications of a society that has a Bill of Life.

 

Would you make the choice to live forever even if it meant you wouldn’t be allowed to have children?  In the year 2140 most people do.  In order to take Longevity, people have to sign the Declaration.  People that choose to have children anyway are arrested and put in prison and the children are taken and put into something that resembles an orphanage.  The children are referred to as Surplus.

Surplus Anna is one of the most promising occupants of Grange Hall, a bleak and cold housing unit for illegal children.  She is proud of her accomplishments as a housekeeper.  She will soon reach the age where she leaves Grange Hall and is placed in a permanent job.  Anna is happy she has been able to pay back society for exisiting.  She feels anger toward her parents for even putting her in this situation and adding to the drain on the world’s resources.  Anna doesn’t think much about a life of freedom until Peter shows up at Grange Hall and tells her things that only her parents could know.

Together, Anna and Peter set out on an adventure that changes their lives forever.  They both find family they didn’t know existed and Anna learns just how much she can care for another person. 

THE DECLARATION is a frightening look at what can happen when the government takes control over life itself.  As appealing as living forever may seem, it is clear the consequences far outweigh the benefits.